Walk the Wainwrights

Skiddaw Blencathra and Derwent Water from Kings How.jpg

Alfred Wainwright (1997 - 1991) is regarded as the 'patron saint of Lake District Walkers' - though he was a Lancashire lad who didn't visit the area until he was 23. That walking trip with his cousin was a turning point in his life, within a year he ws married and living in Kendal. Every day he would travel by bus to walk the fells, mainly alone, recording in meticulous detail his routes and making fine sketches of the mountains and culminaiting in the seven volumes of his Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells.

Keswick is an ideal base from which to start your conquest of the Wainwrights. There are 214 fells and mountains included in the seven volumes of Alfred Wainwright's Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells. The Northern fells lie closest to Keswick but the Lake District is so compact that any one or more of the 214 fells could be reached and climbed within a day.

The Wainwright Society holds a 'Wainwright 214 Completers Register' and badges and certificates are also available for those who have completed the challenge.

THE NORTHERN FELLS

Skiddaw - 931 m 
Blencathra- 868 m
Skiddaw Little Man - 865 m
Carl Side - 746 m
Long Side - 734 m 
Lonscale Fell - 715 m 
Knott - 710 m 
Bowscale Fell - 702 m 
Great Calva - 690 m 
Ullock Pike - 690 m 
Bannerdale Crags - 683m 
Bakestall - 673m 
Carrock Fel - 663m 
High Pike - 658m
Great Sca Fell, 651m 
Mungrisdale Common - 633m 
Brae Fell - 586m
Meal Fell - 550m 
Great Cockup - 526m
Souther Fell - 522m 
Dodd - 502m 
Longlands Fell - 483m
Binsey - 447m
Latrigg - 367 m 

Forty years ago Wainwright came up with a long distance walk which has become a classic in its own right. Taking about two weeks from St Bees on the west coast to Robin Hood's Bay in Yorkshire it explores what Wainwright called 'the grandest territory in the north of England'. The walk passes close to Keswick and although his version is completed in 12 stages - others have since broken the trek down to take almost three weeks, a more leisurely way to take in the views.